In this world of 7.6 billion people, many inequalities and injustices exist along with issues that relate to social injustice issues. Education is one of many social injustice issues that numbers of countries suffer with. When it comes to educating young women in places like Somalia or Pakistan, the numbers are very low. Many young women do not have the chance to get the education that they need. They are usually taught to work and do house chores while young men go to school and get the education. After looking at worldwide female education statistics, one can realize that poverty and women education is closely related. Many countries in South Africa such as Central African Republic and Somalia are suffering in a vicious cycle of poverty which resulted in lack of women education.

Poverty in South Africa is more serious than what we already know. Stats have shown that more than half of South Africans are living in poverty. Every day they have to struggle to get the basics of living while the other side of the world enjoys their wealth that is more than enough. Life in South Africa is difficult. Researchers have presented that, “589 million people live without electricity. As a result, a staggering 80 percent of the population relies on biomass products such as wood, charcoal, and dung in order to cook,” and, “of the 738 million people globally who lack access to clean water, 37 percent are living in sub-Saharan Africa.” In Central African Republic, many young children were orphaned due to numbers of civil wars and AIDS crisis. There are many young youths trying to make a living for them and their younger siblings without access to the basic services. According to the SOS Children’s Villages International, roughly 90 per cent of the population lives in crippling poverty, without access to food, sanitation, and decent housing.” However the fact that “children make up a vast part of the country’s population as nearly half of all Central Africans are less than 14 years of age,” is devastating. Many of them are orphans or grew up with no parents or a single parent. In Somalia, it is not as bad as Central Africa Republic but statistics are still very miserable. Somalia has a 73 percent poverty rate and again, it is one of the poorest countries in the world. According to the Rural Poverty Portal, Somalia is still suffering from “long-term civil conflict, the lack of a fully functioning government, and natural disasters.” also “about 40 per cent of the population lives in extreme poverty; in rural areas, this figure exceeds 50 per cent.” Again, many of the population are young orphaned children who are trying to make a living out of limited resources. Lack of infrastructure and limited access to services make it extra challenging for such young children to survive. Many of them lose hope and choose the wrong path before they reach their twenties.

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Such extreme poverty affects the children’s access to education. South Africa, in general, does not have a well-built education system, whereas, in Canada, new systems are enrolled every few years for better and higher quality education. Research from The Economists states that, “A shocking 27% of pupils who have attended school for six years cannot read, compared with 4% in Tanzania and 19% in Zimbabwe. After five years of school, about half cannot work out that 24 divided by three is eight. Only 37% of children starting school goes on to pass the matriculation exam; just 4% earn a degree.” It already shows how much they lack in the education system. In the Central Africa Republic, primary school net enrollment rate is not so low with 72 percent, however, the actual rate of enrollment is extremely low with 3% in preprimary and 7% in secondary education. Another big problem in Central Africa Republic is lack of teachers and classrooms including basic facilities and textbooks. Also, it is hard for younger women to be enrolled in the education system because they have to either help their parents with house chores or they have to be the parent. Orphaned girls with younger siblings have no other choice but to take care of its younger siblings. Therefore, they do not have enough time to go to school and get the education. When this lifestyle continues, it affects their younger siblings as well. Since no one in the family was enrolled in school, no one can really help them to get started with education, so they just start working at a very young age. Some teens get sick from different diseases such as AIDS and HIV. Their health conditions block them from being able to get the education that they need. And a lot of these relate to young girls.

Education in Somalia is another ongoing problem. Many schools and other educational buildings were destroyed due to long years of civil wars. They do not have a proper government to fund them with enough money to rebuild those destroyed schools and even if they were rebuilt, just like what some regions are doing, there is a high chance of it being destroyed either due to a natural disaster, another civil war, and weak foundation. Just like any other countries in South Africa, when the children are old enough to work on fields, they usually go out and work with crops so they can feed themselves and their family. Crops are also used to trade and possibly make a profit, but it is inadequate for a family to have a stable life. Stats from UNICEF have shown that “only 30 per cent of children are in school and only 40 per cent of these are girls. Further, only 18 per cent of children in rural households are in school.” These numbers are extremely low compared to other countries. Also, these numbers may drastically change if another war breaks out. Also because of poverty, parents cannot afford school fees. There are some free primary public education systems, but they lack in numbers of teachers, especially female teachers, who are willing to teach in such a remote area. Health issue is one of the main reasons why female teachers do not want to teach at Somalia. UNICEF has also presented the difference between the participation rates of girls’ compared to the boys’ participation. According to them, “girls’ participation in education is consistently lower than that for boys. Fewer than 50 per cent of girls attend primary school, and the last countrywide surveys from 2006 showed that only 25 per cent of women aged 15 to 24 were literate.” Again, this is a very disheartening stat, but this is the reality that everyone needs to be aware of.

As a person who lives in a wealthy country with the excessive number of services and needs, everyone should be aware and have empathy towards these unfortunate people and consider funding them. Just like the “drowning child analogy” of Peter Singer, one should not act blinded in front of such devastating truths. Instead, one should fight to bring equality and rights to the unfortunate ones so that they can at least have access the minimum of what they deserve. There are many organizations supporting and fighting for educating young females such as UNICEF, Global Partnership for Education, CARE, and more and one should not be afraid to be the first one to support them and be a part of them. That being said, it is also important to know what kind of charity or organizations that one is supporting. Also, if there are any chances for one to go and actually help out in such areas, one should not hesitate to go and bring hope and light to such places. Just because they were born in Somalia, Central Africa Republic, or any other poor countries doesn’t mean that they do not have any potential to become someone who can later bring a change to this world, and as a privileged one, working together to bring out the hidden stars shouldn’t be something to be ashamed of.

Education in Somalia is another ongoing problem. Many schools and other educational buildings were destroyed due to long years of civil wars. They do not have a proper government to fund them with enough money to rebuild those destroyed schools and even if they were rebuilt, just like what some regions are doing, there is a high chance of it being destroyed either due to a natural disaster, another civil war, and weak foundation. Just like any other countries in South Africa, when the children are old enough to work on fields, they usually go out and work with crops so they can feed themselves and their family. Crops are also used to trade and possibly make a profit, but it is inadequate for a family to have a stable life. Stats from UNICEF have shown that “only 30 per cent of children are in school and only 40 per cent of these are girls. Further, only 18 per cent of children in rural households are in school.” These numbers are extremely low compared to other countries. Also, these numbers may drastically change if another war breaks out. Also because of poverty, parents cannot afford school fees. There are some free primary public education systems, but they lack in numbers of teachers, especially female teachers, who are willing to teach in such a remote area. Health issue is one of the main reasons why female teachers do not want to teach at Somalia. UNICEF has also presented the difference between the participation rates of girls’ compared to the boys’ participation. According to them, “girls’ participation in education is consistently lower than that for boys. Fewer than 50 per cent of girls attend primary school, and the last countrywide surveys from 2006 showed that only 25 per cent of women aged 15 to 24 were literate.” Again, this is a very disheartening stat, but this is the reality that everyone needs to be aware of.

As a person who lives in a wealthy country with the excessive amount of services and needs, everyone should be aware and have empathy towards these unfortunate people and consider funding them. Just like the “drowning child analogy” of Peter Singer, one should not act blinded in front of such devastating truths. Instead, one should fight to bring equality and rights to the unfortunate ones so that they can at least have access the minimum of what they deserve. There are many organizations supporting and fighting for educating young females such as UNICEF, Global Partnership for Education, CARE, and more and one should not be afraid to be the first one to support them and be a part of them. That being said, it is also important to know what kind of charity or organizations that one is supporting. Also, if there are any chances for one to go and actually help out in such areas, one should not hesitate to go and bring hope and light to such places. Just because they were born in Somalia, Central Africa Republic, or any other poor countries doesn’t mean that they do not have any potential to become someone who can later bring a change to this world, and as a privileged one, working together to bring out the hidden stars shouldn’t be something

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