In my view, the three most
convincing arguments in favour of Catalonia becoming an independent nation from
Spain are:

1.       GDP and Global Trade:
Wilson states that “the share of Catalonia exports to the rest of Spain has fallen
from 57% in 2000 to 47% in 2011”. The Catalonia independence could potentially
further reduce the trades between two regions and hence, act as a natural
accelerator to diversify the trading partners and sign bilateral agreements
with countries outside EU like India, China, Japan and Canada. The graph 1.1
below shows the GDP change in % terms for the past several years for EU, Spain
and Catalonia. The
Catalonia region has seen similar growth as the rest of Spain. If Catalonia
is able to negotiate trade agreements successfully, it can observe similar GDP
growth levels as it has seen in the past. G1 G2 

2.       Culture,
History and Tourism: Catalonia is a
region with its own culture and language. Spain has
been unwilling to negotiate more autonomy. Independence is the only way to take
full control of Catalan public spending on infrastructure and finances. Catalonia
has half of the total start-ups in Spain. Almost 25% of the total tourists
visiting Spain is inG3  the Catalonia region.  The
second pillar of today’s Catalan economy, after exports, is tourism. This
ability to attract foreign tourists is illustrated by the fact that 25% of the
nearly 58 million foreign visitors to Spain in 2012 came to Catalonia, its top
destination and also the one showing the most positive trend in the period
2011-2012, with 10% growth. Outside Spain, Catalonia could create its own rules
and regulations to accommodate its social and economic needs.
Various separatists are arguing that Catalonia is
more likely to succeed if it is independent; it is also the only way to
preserve the Catalan culture, history, identity, and language. There are
research centres and universities that have had to delay or stop projects
because the Spanish government has frozen their bank accounts. It is perceived
as a repression of Catalans, further sparking creating a case for independent Catalonia.
 

3.       Macroeconomics
policies: A wide array of economic
policy instruments that are currently under the exclusive control of the
Spanish government and parliament would suddenly be at the Catalonians’ disposal.
It would allow them to define their own policies and a new regulatory framework
for the labour, fiscal and financial sectors, as well as public administration
– with no more additional restrictions than those coming from European
regulations. According to atlanticsentinel.com, “Catalonia pays more into
Spain’s central government in taxes every year than it gets back in spending
and subsidies”. The report Doing Business, published annually by the World
Bank, offers us a way of measuring our potential in this sense. The latest
edition ranks Spain 44th out of 183 countries in a global league
based on the “ease of doing business”. The economic viability of an
independent Catalonia could potentially further increase if the following
principles were considered in the foundation of the new nation:

a.       A new public administration setup
based on the principles of fiscal prudence, efficiency and quality service to
citizens.

b.       The supreme importance of simple,
fast and efficient legal procedures that maximise a person’s legal protection.

c.       
The use
of English as a third official language, emphasising its role as a language in
globalisation and connection to the world. This would be essential in the
global expansion of Catalan companies and the limited dependency on the Spanish
market.

d.       A flexible and effective labour
framework that is restricted to guaranteeing respect for established procedures
and for a lack of discrimination.

e.       A taxation system for both
individuals and companies that favours FDI and FII, and attracts talent.

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